Earthship Homes Making Strides — Someone Built My Home!

by Sterling D. Allan
Pure Energy Systems News

Today, while browsing my Facebook page, I came across an image of an Earthship home that struck me as looking like what I envisioned the house I designed back in 2009 would look like. Even the trees in front resemble the natural land surrounding our lot that is part of the Safe Haven Villages intentional community project that is hopefully in process of emerging from chaos mode.

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“Wow, someone did it!” I thought.

I clicked through to see the enlargement, then started clicking through the other images in that Earthship folder. There are a ton of them, and they’re all amazing.

I was astonished at the beauty and level of maturity the Earthship project has achieved.

I know how hard it is to build structures like this, having built two sheds out of rammed earth, not to completion yet. I shook my head in amazement at how presumptuous we had been to think we could build an entire home using this method that is so utterly labor intensive. We pretty much had abandoned the idea.

Seeing the success of so many structures on that Facebook folder rekindled some of the lost enthusiasm I used to have for this project.

To prove to you that I really did envision a house like this, here is a second draft of a floor plan that I drew in November 2009, inspired by a plan by Michael Reynolds of Earthships.org. We posted this at http://peswiki.com/index.php/OS:Sterling_Allan%27s_Sustainable_Home.  You can click on the history tab to see earlier versions of the page to see that we did post these things back in 2009.

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Note the curvature of the house, and the solarium along the front, with the outcropping on the side. I even envisioned a door in the middle, just like the one in the photo above.

I’d say there is an 85% resemblance between that photo and what I had envisioned at one point.

One important difference is that in my design, the solarium windows would be vertical, rather than inclined, and there would be an eave overhang. This way the sun is excluded in the summer but comes in during the winter, and the angle of refraction in the Spring and Fall is such that the solar gain is there but diminished by the refraction. This is the way my dad did it in their home.

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